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About the Project

Pumped-storage hydropower is a method of storing energy by pumping water uphill and holding it in a reservoir. This water can be released downhill later through the hydropower turbines when it is most needed.

The Mokelumne Water Battery Project will reduce California’s reliance on fossil fuels by meeting the state’s energy demands with reliable renewable energy.

When GreenGen Storage completes the Project, it will provide between 400 and 1200 megawatts (MW) of electricity, depending on the state’s energy needs, engineering design, and environmental considerations.

How Pumped Storage Works

Project Location

The Mokelumne Water Battery Project is located in the Sierra Nevada mountains, east of Sacramento, and about 33 miles east of Jackson, California. The project will pump water from the existing Salt Springs Reservoir up to the Lower Bear River and/or Upper Bear River Reservoirs, all located on the Mokelumne River. The project will also include a water conveyance tunnel connecting the reservoirs, a powerhouse, transmission line, and other associated infrastructure. When GreenGen Storage completes the Project, it will provide between 400 and 1200 megawatts (MW) of energy, depending on the state’s energy needs, engineering design, and environmental considerations.